Acupuncture Strategy - Lung and Large Intestine Syndromes

Lung and Large Intestine Syndromes

The lungs are situated in the chest. They connect with the throat and open into the nose. Their main physiological functions are dominating qi (vital energy), controlling respiration, maintaining the smoothness of different vessels, and regulating water flow. The skin and hair are important indicators of their health. The lung meridian communicates with the large intestine meridian creating an exterior and interior relationship between these two organs. The two organ systems influence each other closely.

The lungs are vulnerable organs. When exogenous pathogens enter the body through the mouth, nasal or body surface, they are always affected first leading to disharmonies of the lung.

Lung syndromes Meridians for the selection of major acupoints Techniques Wind-cold retention in the lung The lung and large intestine meridians Reducing needling techniques, and combine with moxibustion if necessary Heat retention in the lung The lung and large intestine meridians Reducing needling techniques, or use "pricking" needles to draw small amount of blood from certain acupoints Phlegm and dampness obstructing lung The lung, spleen and stomach meridians Reducing needling techniques Yin deficiency of the lung The lung and kidney meridians, and also the back transport point Reinforcing needling techniques; do not use moxibustion Qi deficiency of the lung The lung and spleen meridians and also the back transport points Reinforcing needling techniques, combine with moxibustion if necessary Localized symptoms along the course of the lung meridian, e.g. shoulder pain, muscular spasm of the front arms The lung meridian and its connecting points Use a combination of acupuncture and moxibustion Heat irritating the lung meridian causing bleeding and pain in the nasal and throat regions The lung and large intestine meridians Reducing needling techniques; blood-letting method if necessary
Large intestine syndromes Meridians for the selection of major acupoints Needling Techniques Cold retention in the large intestine The alarm points and the lower sea points of the large intestine A combination of acupuncture and moxibustion Toxic heat retention in the large intestine The large intestine and stomach meridians, specially the alarm points and the lower sea points of the large intestine Reducing needling techniques Chronic and persistent diarrhea The spleen, stomach, governor vessel and conception vessel meridians Combining use of acupuncture and moxibustion Constipation The stomach and large intestine meridians Reducing needling techniques; do nnot use moxibustion Localized symptoms along the course of the large intestine meridian e.g. pain and weakness of the back arm The large intestine meridian Reducing needling techniques; combine with moxibustion if necessary
Lung and Large Intestine Meridian